Rivers and rot

We’re back!

April and I enjoyed our time on the lake over the past few days.  We did some hiking, some tubing, and I got to water ski.  Unfortunately, the boat broke right before April’s turn. (That seems to be a pattern.)

We hiked through the forest a bit, enjoyed a waterfall, and I discovered that I love the smell of rot.  April tells me that the sweet smell that I attributed to lots of trees and fresh air is mostly rot.  Be that as it may, it still smells amazing to me.

While hiking, we spent a good deal of time around a river and a waterfall, which got me thinking.  The river and the waterfall both change the surrounding landscape in different ways.  The river may be re-routed because of excess water in any given year and adjust the layout of the forest at the same time.  

How is my path shaped?  How does the shape of my path affect the world around me?  Does most change come in the process of being overwhelmed?  Proverbs 21:1 compares the heart of a king to a river of water in the way that it is stretched by God’s hands.  

In the midst of running away, I finished Eugene Peterson’s Eat This Book.  (Yes, I do read books by other authors as well.)  In it, Peterson addresses how we interact with the Bible, and how we can “eat” or make it a part of us and be shaped by it.  Part of that process, he suggests, is paying attention to metaphor- something that I rarely do as I should.  He also discusses lectio divina, literally “spiritual reading” and what Peterson defines as a “cultivated, developed habit of living the [Bible] in Jesus’ name.”  

So being a newbie at the pattern of lectio divina and pondering the significance of a walk through the forest, I was, and am, left with wonderings and gratefulness that there’s grace in the journey of following Jesus.  The direction of the Holy Spirit to a random verse in Proverbs as I noticed the shape of the river is but one proof.

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